Tag Archives: film

Iron Man

Mike Caprio 1 Reply

They should have called it “AWESOME MAN” but I understand the whole licensing thing and whatever… It was very well done. It wasn’t quite the same level of blockbuster for me that Spider-Man was; somehow it just didn’t have the same directorial joie-de-vivre and depth that Sam Raimi injected into the Spider, but Jon Favreau […]

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To All Netflix Subscribers:

Mike Caprio 4 Replies

The King Of Kong is now available as a Netflix instant watching movie. I highly, highly recommend this film! It’s an incredible piece of modern cultural history framed by the eternal struggle of the underdog outsider versus the establishment. And hey, DONKEY KONG!! I witnessed Steve Wiebe achieve the fourth ever known kill screen here […]

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Apple, Fox, Netflix, and Online Movies

Mike Caprio 2 Replies

The first major film studio since Disney is now in partnership with Apple, signifying that the computer maker’s dominance in the media delivery business is official. Not only will iTunes begin delivering content from 20th Century Fox; new Fox DVDs will have FairPlay (Apple’s DRM) embedded in them (for “easy ripping” to iTunes). Apple is […]

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There Will Be Blood [2007]

Mike Caprio 4 Replies

There Will Be OSCARS. Oh yes, there will be Oscars.

Paul Thomas Anderson may not be the most prolific auteur in Hollywood, but he is without a doubt the most consistently brilliant. It’s been five years since Punch Drunk Love, and it’s been eight years since Magnolia, but it has surely been worth the wait, because this film is his Citizen Kane. It is an epic tragedy of ambition that pulls whole cloth from Shakespeare’s MacBeth and any number of depressing Greek sagas, but weaves the tale with an originality that is rarely found these days. He has honestly made Ang Lee and Brokeback Mountain look pathetic in comparison (okay, well, that’s a romantic tragedy, but you get my drift).

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The Golden Compass [2007]

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When I first came across The Golden Compass as a novel, several years ago, I was pretty fascinated by the concepts presented in it; every reviewer compared it to Tolkein as similar in scope. And to some degree, I think this is true; the alternate world in Phillip Pullman’s trilogy is grand and diverse, with a sweeping, rich tapestry of history.

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